Saturday, September 08, 2007

THE DIVINE MADELEINE L'ENGLE


awrinkleintime, originally uploaded by patryfrancis.

“Why does anybody tell a story? It has something to do with faith, faith that the universe has meaning, that our little human lives are not irrelevant, that what we choose or say or do matters, matters cosmically.”

And when the Divine Madeleine told a story, it did. What better epitaph could a writer--or indeed any human being-- ever have?

25 comments:

Sustenance Scout said...

Patry, I don't think I've ever been the first to comment on one of your posts. I'm so glad I stumbled upon this one; Madeleine has been on my mind today, though I didn't know she'd passed away on Thursday. Her impact on my life-- and on the lives of so many young readers like me who read Wrinkle and decided then and there no other life but a writing life would do (even if it took many years to fully realize this devotion)--has been tremendous.

rdl said...

how did i ever miss this one? adding to list.
So glad to see you back!

marja-Leena said...

I just finished reading the NY TImes article on L'Engle and paused over this very same statement, reading it over and over. I think if we did not feel that our lives and our work meant something, we'd be pretty depressed! Glad to see you back, Patry!

Patry Francis said...

K: She was so inspiring on many levels. Makes me want to read some of those marvelous stories all over again.

r: I'm glad to BE back. Now if blogger, or my computer or whatever it is, would let me access more of my favorite blogs, I'd be in business.

marja-leena: I'm not at all surprised that line struck you. I feel that same spirit in your art.

Amber said...

Oh yes, hers were some of the first words I ate. I can still taste them, and can't wait to read again with my little ones...

:)

Amber said...

Also, I just told my aunt about your book for her bookclub. Hope they like it. ;)

:)

Lisa said...

Patry, I'm so glad to "see" you! I wanted to thank you for indirectly introducing Karen from Sustenance Scout to me. Through you, we met for a very long lunch last week and it turns out we live only a couple of miles apart. Thank you for being the conduit for that connection :)

Patry Francis said...

Amber 1: "hers were some of the first words I ate"--They nourished you well!

Amber 2: I'm thrilled! Many, many thanks.

Lisa: I was so envious when I heard about that wonderful lunch. Envious and of course, most thrilled to hear you had connected. This week I was interviewed for Fiction Addiction on XM radio (won't broadcast for a month). When I was asked about the good things that have happened because of my blog, I mentioned you and Karen. A real friendship that began in a virtual comment section.

Lisa said...

Oh my gosh! I hope you'll have the air date and logistics published on your web site somewhere -- I'd want to hear the interview no matter what, but it will be extra thrilling to hear you talk about how blogging has helped to connect real people!

steve said...

I didn't realize Madeleine L'Engle had died. I read most of her Kairos series books to my children-A Wind in the Door was my favorite. I recently posted a comment on Lisa's blog about how L'Engle had so much trouble publishing A Wrinkle in Time becuase it did not fit snugly into a genre, along with the fact that it began, "It was a dark and stormy night." Thank you for your tribute.

Neil said...

I didn't know about this news. A Wrinkle in Time was my first "serious" book I ever read, and always loved it.

Fred Garber said...

Patry, I have never read anything by her. what should I read?

Becca said...

I so agree - she has been one of my favorites since I was 10. I wrote about her on my blog today, as well.

One of the greats.

Patry Francis said...

Lisa: I will certainly post it. I'm hoping they send me a link since I haven't had access to satellite radio since I left my job--one small thing I miss.

Steve: Some of my very best memories of reading come from the stories I shared with my children. We loved the Kairos series, too.

neil: Now, of course, I feel like I have to read it again--with or without a child to hear it.

fred: You would love her books, I think. There's the Time series--written for children, but so rich that they have something to say to everyone. I particularly like The Small Rain, an adult novel--and I think, her first book, which was written in the forties. Then there are the spiritual books--some scriptural commentary and books on prayer, though I am less familiar with them.

Becca: I'm going to try to get on your blog--though I think it's one of a long list of favorites, which my computer is unable to access. Don't ask me why.

Lorna said...

Such a wonderful oeuvre. I've read many of them more than once, and it was my enjoyment of her work for adolescents that opened up that whole genre---I firmly believe some of the best work is being written for the young---and the cover art prompts people to talk to me on the bus.

Patry Francis said...

Lorna, I agree! We must demand more fairy tales for adults! (Who needs them more than we do?)

Mardougrrl said...

Beautiful. I have been thinking about her too. What a wonderful, writerly life she led!

sue said...

Yes, please post the link to your interview. Would love to check it out.

Thank you for posting this. I, too, didn't realize we'd lost this wonderful writer.

kerry dexter said...

patry,
I've always seen singing as an act of faith, and now thinking about the storytelling element of music...
I can see that will lead somewhere.

by the way, I really like the name of your blog.

Jake Silver said...

I used to love that book. That and The Phantom Tollbooth I would read over and over again!!

Patry Francis said...

mardou: Definitely an inspiration to you and me. Write on!

sue: Thank you for asking for a link; and as long as I don't sound as dumb as I think I did, I will post it!

kerry: SO wonderful to see you here. And yes, there are so many corallaries between music and writing.

Jake: Tha PHantom Tollbooth? Now I think I have to check that out...good to see you here, too.

tinker said...

I was so sad to read about her passing. A Wrinkle In Time (and its sequels) opened up a whole different way of looking at the world, the universe for me.

What a fitting epitaph.

Patry Francis said...

tinker: "a whole different way of looking at the world" I felt that way, too. What a marvelous gift!

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Anonymous said...

I'm kind of late to this post, but I love that L'Engle quote. Does anyone happen to know where/when she said it?